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GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA

WESTERN AUSTRALIAN DIVISION


 

2015 Gibb Maitland Medal Nominations

 

The Gibb Maitland Medal is awarded by the Western Australia Division of the Geological Society of Australia in order to recognize individuals who have made substantial contributions to geoscience in Western Australia.  It is named for Andrew Gibb Maitland, Government Geologist from 1896 to 1926, who established the Geological Survey of Western Australia.  The Medal is usually awarded each year and nominations are now sought for the 2015 Gibb Maitland medallist.

 

2015 Gibb Maitland guidelines & nomination form download: MS Word doc

 

Nominations close Monday 1 December 2014

 

 

West Australian Geologist (WAG)

Bi-monthly newsletter of the Western Australian Division of the Geological Society of Australia Inc.

 

Number 509: October  ̶  November 2014  (1.9 Mb PDF file)

 

Past Issues

 

 

Monthly Meetings

Time:  5.30 pm for 6.00 pm formal start (bar open upstairs before talk)

Venue:  Irish Club of WA, 61 Townshend Rd, Subiaco

Download a map showing the location, or check out the venue with Google Maps.

 

 

NEXT MONTHLY MEETING

 

Wednesday 5th November, 2014

 

Talk title:  A Bizarre Crinoid from a Methane Seep in the Late South Cretaceous of South Dakota, USA

 

Speaker:  Dr Aaron Hunter, Dept. of Applied Geology, Curtin University

 

Abstract:  Despite a rich and varied record, Mesozoic stalked crinoids are relatively rare in the Western Interior Seaway of North America compared to those found in Northern Europe. A unique example of Mesozoic stalked crinoid is described from cold methane seeps (hydrocarbon seep mounds also called “tepee buttes”) from the Upper Cretaceous (upper Campanian) of the Northern Great Plains of the United States; the first crinoids to be described from such an environment. The Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway has never before yielded any identifiable stalked crinoid remains. Nevertheless, there have been significant studies on both free living and stalked crinoids from other locations in the Upper Cretaceous of North America that provide a good basis for comparison.

 

This distinct species is characterized by a tapering homeomorphic column with through-going tubuli, lacking any attachment disc. The arms are unbranched and pinnulate, with muscular and syzygialarticulations. The unique morphology of the column justifies the establishment of a separate family. A new suborder is also proposed as there exists no corresponding taxon within the Articulata that can accommodate all the characteristics of this new genus. This new crinoid shares many features with other members of the articulates, including bathycrinids, bourgueticrinids and guillecrinids within the Order Comatulida, as currently defined in the revised Treatise of Invertebrate Paleontology. Reconstructing the entire crinoid using hundreds of semi-articulated and disarticulated (well preserved) fossils, reveals a unique paleoecology and functional morphology specifically adapted to living within this hydrocarbon seep environment.

 

About the speaker:  Aaron joined Curtin University as Senior Lecturer of Palaeontology and Biostratigraphy in 2013. He was recently a Visiting Fellow and now Life Member at the Clare Hall, University of Cambridge, UK, collaborating with the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. After completing his BSc in Geology from Kingston University, specialising in mineral deposits and petroleum geology, and his MSc in Palaeobiology at the University of Bristol, Aaron gained his PhD in echinoderm taphonomy and palaeoecology from the University of London (Birkbeck College & University College London) in 2006. Aaron has completed Postdoctoral Fellowships at the University of Burgundy, France (CNRS), University of Tokyo, Japan (Royal Society JSPS Fellow and JSPS Bridge Fellow) and University of Göttingen (DAAD), furthering his research into both fossil and extant echinoderms including crinoids (sea lilies) and asterozoans (starfish and brittle stars). In 2010 Aaron was appointed Senior Lecturer at the PETRONAS University of Technology, Malaysia where he established the Malaysian Centre of Palaeobiodiversity (MCPB) and was Deputy Director of the South East Asia Carbonate Research Laboratory (SEACARL), supervising MSc and PhD students and was course director for the undergraduate Palaeontology and Physical Geology courses. During this period he held a short term fellowship at NESCent, Duke University USA and was a visiting associate at the American Museum of Natural History.

 

 

2014 GSA-WA AGM Minutes

The GSA-WA Division 2014 Annual General Meeting was held at the Irish Club, Subiaco on Wednesday 2 April 2014.

Click Here to Download the 2014 AGM Minutes (598 Kb PDF file)

 

 

GSA-WA Student Bursary

 

The GSA-WA offers bursaries to assist students in their studies and research.

 

Up to $1000 can be granted for any meritorious project, for 1 or several students, such as field trips, for laboratory costs, for travel costs or conferences.

 

Applications close 31 March and 30 September each year.

 

View the flyer for further information and complete the application form to submit a nomination.

 

Bursary Flyer download: PDF doc

Bursary Application Conditions download: MS Word doc

Bursary Application Form download: MS Word doc

 

 


 

Last modified: 3 October 2014
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